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Racial and Gender Justice

Reimagine Everything

From a Speech by Grace Lee Boggs

I’m a very old woman. I was born in 1915 in what was later known as the First World War, two years before the Russian Revolution. And because I was born to Chinese immigrant parents and because I was born female—I learned very quickly that the world needed changing.

But what I also learned as I grew older was that how we change the world and how we think about changing the world has to change.

The time has come for us to reimagine everything. We have to reimagine work and go away from labor. We have to reimagine revolution and get beyond protest. We have to think not only about change in our institutions, but changes in ourselves. We are at the stage where the people in charge of the government and industry are running around like chickens with their heads cut off. It’s up to us to reimagine the alternatives and not just protest against them and expect them to do better.

I Am San Francisco Exhibit - Closing Reception, Feb. 22, 2018 - 6-9pm Free!

Closing Reception: Exhibition of I Am San Francisco (IAMSF) (February 22, 2018, 6-9 pm)

Including special guests: Urban Funk Machine and SF Poet Laureate Devorah Majors.

IAMSF explores San Francisco’s social and cultural values and concerns through the lens of its Black natives, residents, and leaders. Curated by Jarrel Phillips, with art by photographer Michole “Micholiano” Forks and muralist Sydney “Sage” Cain. The exhibition brings to life the some of the scores of interviews published in RP&E over the past 2 years. (See below for links.) Meet the artists, eat the free food, all are welcome! Exhibit continues through Feb 2018.  Join us for the Closing Reception on Thursday February 22, 2018, 6-9 pm at SF State University. Cesar Chavez Student Center Art Gallery, 1600 Holloway Street, SF.

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Restorative Justice for Families

By Jo Bauen, Ed.D.

I work for Oakland’s Community Works West, a non-profit aimed at mitigating the impact of incarceration on individuals by using principles of Restorative Justice. Between 2013 and 2016 I taught a parenting class called Parenting Inside-Out to men in Solano Prison in Vacaville, California. The incarcerated fathers and I are now collaborating on what we call “Restorative Justice for Families.” Here’s our story.

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The BLM Effect: Hashtags, History and Race

Janelle Monae and members of Wonderland at SF rally for victims of police violence.  © 2016 Eric K. Arnold

By Eric K. Arnold

Four days after the election of Donald Trump to the US presidency, legendary hip hop group A Tribe Called Quest appeared on Saturday Night Live (SNL). Emcee Q-Tip announced, “Everybody stand up, one fist up in the air!” and proceeded to perform “We The People,” the most overtly-political song of their 26-year career. Tip peeled off some incendiary lines which referenced police brutality—“You be killing off good young brothers.” The song’s chorus took a direct stab at the bigotry aroused during the long Presidential campaign: “All you Black folks, you must go/ All you Mexicans, you must go.”

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