Conversations on Race and Resistance

By Jess Clarke

Today’s emerging resistance movements can draw on a long and varied history to challenge the reactionary US government. Racial justice organizing has been the leading edge of progressive change for generations, and lessons learned and leadership from Black liberation struggles are key to moving beyond resistance and toward revolutionary abundance.

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Spring 2017-Movement Metamorphosis {Registration)

(CLAWS) Collaborative Liberation Arts Workshop Series  Spring Session:

 

Movement Metamorphosis  

 

a 5-week workshop series using movement and dance to open to change from within.

Biodanza facilitated by Mirjam Krohne
Five Saturdays,  April 22 — May 20, 2017

12-2 pm

Studio FAB 2525 Telegraph Ave
Oakland, CA 94612

CLAWS is a workshop series in Oakland that aims to create a laboratory where we can:

  • experiment with new forms of collaboration using writing, theater and movement arts.
  • explore how race, class and gender oppression can be resisted and transformed.
  • work with one another inside and outside of sessions to create performance, story, and movement that can energize and liberate—personally and socially.
  • create a community of reflection, performance and action.

To register by postal mail download the pdf

Time Runs Short to Stop SF Public Land Giveaway

Street art by Ivy Jeanne McClelland, part of Clarion Alley Mural Project in San Francisco’s Mission District. cc 2017 Marcy Rein

Community college and low-income residents face big loss of public resource

By Marcy Rein and Christine Hanson

On weekdays the windswept lot next to the main campus of City College of San Francisco (CCSF) can hold close to 1,000 cars belonging to students and teachers. On weekends a motorcycle safety class practices there, as does the marching band from Archbishop Riordan High School. This lot, the Balboa Reservoir, is one of the largest tracts of public land in land-starved San Francisco—and a key arena in the city’s fight to stem displacement of its vulnerable communities and the institutions that serve them.

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Heritage of Healing: Ecology of Hope

By Kelly Curry

It’s a bright sunny Sunday and I’m sitting in my homeboy’s restaurant drinking a cup of his rich, black coffee. With ceiling fans whirling overhead, the last customer, of the last rush, hustles out the door. He nods goodbye to him and then turns to me, “What are you doing today?”

I tell him I’m working on a series of interviews with guys who have recently been released from prison and are now working the land and growing food for the community.

“What a joke.” He says, grabbing the remote and pointing it towards the wide flat screen overhead, “Those guys don’t stand a chance,” he mashes the mute button, “why would anybody hire a ex-con when they can have a guy with no record, never did anything and works hard? You know what a thief does? They steal...you know what a junkie does? They use. End of story.”

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